What would you change about your body, given the chance? The answer to this all-too-common question is very different when you ask a five-year-old and a 25-year-old – but in essence, we all have something up our sleeve.

In a four-minute video posted by the Jubilee Project, in association with iNature Skincare, the company’s founders Jason, Eddie and Eric asked 50 children and adults the same question, making their viewers think about the last time they felt comfortable - or uncomfortable, more to the point - in their own skin.

Posted in October last year to promote change and do good in terms of our perception of self and positive body image, the video - titled “Comfortable: 50 people 1 question” - has since had over four million views. Its popularity is likely due to the fact that wanting to change our bodies in some way appears to be part of the human experience. There is all one thing niggling on our mind that we’d love to rectify.

Its popularity is likely due to the fact that wanting to change our bodies in some way appears to be part of the human experience.

From listening to the adults, it initially seems as though this is something we develop. Many of the reasons provided by the older interviewees were based on bad incidents or negative associations with their appearance; some were bullied, some were wishing for their younger body or were even envious of what their friends’ bodies looked like.

Often the media is given a bad reputation for promoting this negativity, especially amongst women, with the proliferation of photoshop and size zero models in adverts and fashion magazines. It is thought our context and the constant demand for being perfect has an unwaveringly detrimental impact, and that our society needs to change.

The pint-sized interviewees demonstrated the space in our life when, actually, all we want is a mermaid tail, shark mouth, wings to fly and legs like a cheetah.

Yet the desire to be different was also evident in the pint-sized interviewees, who demonstrated the space in our life when, actually, all we want is a mermaid tail, shark mouth, wings to fly and legs like a cheetah. While the actual body part that people want to change may alter as they age, the video demonstrates that wishing to improve our bodies, in any imaginable way, seems to be a natural part of our social experience and that maybe we should just accept it as who we are – but also not let it override how much we love ourselves either, in the beautifully-imperfect way that we were born.

Words: Katie Aske