Grace Carter: Can you talk me through your understanding of the concept behind the photo shoot, Dark Wilt?

Angela Hamilton-Daley: We shot the story in December so I felt there was an element of winter darkness. We definitely didn't want a gothic feeling - more of a romantic one, hence the rose turned dark. We aimed to create the sense of the subject being lost in her own emotions - the face being still fresh with youth.

We definitely didn’t want a gothic feeling - more of a romantic one, hence the rose turned dark. We aimed to create the sense of the subject being lost in her own emotions - the face being still fresh with youth.

GC: How did you go about working with the photographer and stylist to decide on the make-up direction for the shoot?

AHD: When the concept for the Dark Wilt shoot was conceived, Zadrian, the stylist, contacted me with an outline of the story. The visuals accompanied the written brief in the form of a storyboard. I then researched vintage and current makeup trends that corresponded with the story idea, for example, catwalk looks, editorial shoots, movies, history books etc. I had never worked with Katja, the photographer, so I also researched her work, looking at the signature moods and lighting effects she uses. Finally, I sent the editorial team my ideas in mood-board format.

GC: What kind of preparation did you do in advance?

AHD: In preparation for the shoot, I sourced past editorial images of the model to assess her strongest look. Once all the team (including the hair-stylist) had exchanged ideas, I looked at the type of makeup I needed then contacted the makeup PRs, requesting the best and most current shades needed to create the desired look. For this story, I also had to visit Charles Fox and Screen Face (specialist makeup shops), as one of the main references was a black paint effect on the hands and body.

The colour palette juxtaposed the black aesthetic of the set, with clothing and hair in matted beige tones - the idea was to keep the beauty and romance in her face.

GC: Can you talk me through the make-up in Dark Wilt - both the general direction and colours used, but also what products worked well?

AHD: The main idea was that the girl didn't appear gothic. The colour palette juxtaposed the black aesthetic of the set, with clothing and hair in matted beige tones - the idea was to keep the beauty and romance in her face. There needed to be a calm balance as so much black was going to be involved. MAC (face and body makeup) was used to base the skin as it is light in effect and was good for building - creating a semi-opaque effect without heaviness, and also for basing the eyelids and lips to give a neutral canvas to work on. Light contouring of grey shades were used on the cheek bones to give a subtle contrast to the beige palette; cream-textured eye colour in a beige tone (MAC Pro Longwear Paint Pots in Layin’ Low) was applied, blending in-sync with lighting, clothing and hair.

GC: Do you adapt your make-up style for different models and, if so, how do you do this?

AHD: My makeup style is always adapted to the models' individual looks and personality. The idea is to cultivate an aura of confidence through their strongest look. The most important thing I do to adapt a makeup style for an individual model is to create the right base tones. My mantra being the skin needs to breathe, feeling light and natural, almost like wearing a comfortable pair of new shoes. One of the things I also do is to look at the shape of the face to assess if contouring is needed.

GC: What is one of the most challenging parts of doing the make-up for a professional photo shoot?

AHD: The main challenges that come with doing makeup for a professional shoot are bringing the concept of a story into fruition.

GC: What is your greatest tip for make-up artists that you have learnt from working on these kinds of shoots?

AHD: Integrity is number one, and also listening to everyone's ideas. Offering constructive viewpoints and enjoying the moments of artistic collaboration are also important.

Words: Grace Carter

See the full editorial "DARK WILT"