The work of contemporary visual artist, Trine Boesen is placed at the conceptual crossroad of fantasy painting, psychedelic art, and a type of realism that seeks to invert, challenge, and disturb reality.

Educated at the Jutland Art Academy in Aarhus from 1995-1997, and the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts from 1997-2002, Boesen’s process collapses the limitations of painting; unruly, wild spaces are constantly created and re-articulated as lived experiences in her work. She explores the nature of shape, employing disobedience of lines and angles with a surprisingly docile integrity.

The work of Trine Boesen is placed at the conceptual crossroad of fantasy painting, psychedelic art, and a type of realism that seeks to invert, challenge, and disturb reality.

With ‘The Hole in the Wall – Sensory Exhibition’, currently held at Brandts Gallery in Denmark, Boesen reaches inside her two-dimensional work to grab a handful of elements, which are then arranged in three-dimensional form. The artist employs a visual vocabulary that is consistent with her artistic expression – this time doubled by a necessary physical dimension. Unknown galaxies, ambiguously organic shapes, chaotic spaces; these elements define the unknown, despite being grounded in recognisable reality.

With The Hole in the Wall, Boesen employs a visual vocabulary that is consistent with her artistic expression – this time doubled by a necessary physical dimension.

Undulating contours in Boesen´s paintings are echoed by interrupted experiences and intentionally semi-restricted access. The exhibition space is segregated, with corridors and passage points that require visitors´ active handling of objects.

Much like in a fairy-tale, a natural narrative is announced with an actual hole in the wall. From this somewhat magical point of entering, there is no going back and forging forward demands physical engagement with strange objects and unexpected obstacles. The space is what it is, with viewers left to simply react to its meandering structures and overwhelming play of light and colour. “You can sense yourself, while passing through,” says Boesen, with such heightened awareness restoring viewers to the primacy of play.

Much like in a fairy-tale, a natural narrative is announced with an actual hole in the wall. From this somewhat magical point of entering, there is no going back.

Boesen’s curatorial intention clearly lies with constructing and directing the visitors’ interactive experience. In her 2014 installation, ‘New Resort’, Boesen invited visitors to stand inside her huge painting ‘The Grand Cabinet’, thus breaking down the boundaries of medium, while arguably controlling the reception of the work. This attempt is equally prevalent in ‘The Hole in the Wall’ where the installation space is designed to 'surround and include' visitors, to challenge senses, and drive mechanisms of memory making.

The installation space is designed to ‘surround and include’ visitors, to challenge senses, and drive mechanisms of memory making.

In this sense, ‘The Hole in the Wall’ is marking a tension in the commonly held understanding of the museum and gallery experience as a place for learning and cultural creation. The viewers’ expectations are thrown inside Boesen’s paradigmatic black hole, with ‘The Hole in the Wall’ instead offering a space for the uncomplicated sake of undiluted play.

Hullet i muren / The Hole in the Wall A Sensory Exhibition by Trine Boesen.

20.11.2015 – 27.03.2016 at Brandts Gallery, Odense Denmark.

Words: Elena Stanciu

Artist: Trine Boesen